Nails in Cheese at Dog Parks?

Claim:   Nails have been found in pieces of cheese left in dog parks.

MIXTURE


Example:   [Collected via e-mail, October 2011]

There’s a rumor going around facebook that has a photo of small blocks of cheese with nails in them. It says “New trend at dog parks, nails in pieces of cheese, if you take your dogs to dog parks, please be careful!!”
  DOG PARK ALERT: We have received two notices. (1) Nails wrapped in cheese at dog parks in Chicago and Massachusetts (see pic). (2) from some friends that in Augusta Maine dog park, antifreeze is being found in doggie water bowls. Please beware and be careful and PLEASE SHARE and spread the word. sigh

Origins:   These alarming heads-up began circulating on social media sites like Facebook in October 2011, usually accompanied by a photo depicting a handful of cubes of cheese that had nails run through them.
The photo came from an actual news story about such an event, but that incident occurred in Buenos Aires in July 2011. A dog Nails in cheese walker in Centennial Park in that city discovered the nail-laced treats on the floor of a nearby kennel. There was no report of animals having been harmed.
Regarding the oft-included claim that “they found cheese like this in parks in Chicago and Ma.,” we’ve found no evidence that any such discoveries were made. There are no news stories about such finds.
Similarly, regarding the claim “antifreeze is being found in doggie water bowls,” we’ve yet to happen upon credible news reports confirming that.
In a nutshell:

  • The photograph of cheese cubes with nails through them is real.

  • It came from a July 2011 news story in Argentina about such spiked treats being found in a kennel near a public park in Buenos Aires.
  • There are no reports of nail-spiked cheese being found in dog parks in Chicago or Massassachussetts.
  • There are no confirmed reports of antifreeze being found in water bowls at dog parks.
  • Last updated:   3 October 2011
    Urban Legends Reference Pages © 1995-2011 by Barbara and David P. Mikkelson.
    This material may not be reproduced without permission.
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    I hate that anyone did this in the one place it did happen, but apparently no doggies were reported to have been harmed in Buenos Aires where it happened. It is not a trend that is spreading rapidly. It was one isolated incident. I love Snopes.com and check it for everything before I blindly copy and paste what my friends and relatives insist upon. Think before you click “share” or copy/past something. I know you’re all intelligent. 🙂

    View the full blog at heartchasms.blogspot.com and like the blog on Facebook.

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