An Important Impotent Omnipotent

There are so many different words in the English language that that people confuse or think are interchangeable.  Browsing internet forums, some of the funniest misunderstandings can occur.  Just the other day, while reading the comments section of an article regarding the recent mass-deaths of birds in Arkansas (among other places) I read where a person had stated, “Now if hillbillies start killing over in Arkansas…”  I’m quite certain the person meant to say, “Now if hillbillies start keeling over in Arkansas…” but by using the wrong word he brought his sentence a whole new morbidly hilarious meaning.

I’m guilty of misusing words.  My grandmother pointed out recently that I had been incorrectly using the words innumerable and enumerable for many many years; I don’t think I remembered to correct the specific sentence she’d noticed my error in, but I was surprised to learn that I’d been making the error.  I get annoyed at people interchanging their/there/they’re, your/you’re, to/two/too, be/bee, of/have, etc.

I don’t remember the site I was on today, but I noticed the confusion of important/impotent, which in and of itself lends humor to sentences that might not have been meant as comedy, but then toss in another commonly mixed up word: omnipotent.  As the above images show, these three words have different meanings, but on the internet, sometimes, people just don’t get that.

I suppose that an omnipotent could be impotent.  After all, the Christian God has only had one son in how many years?  And that was done through supernatural insemination.  Ol’ Zeus, though, could not have been impotent; I mean, look at the numbers his loins spawned!  For theists, their omnipotent is important.  For atheists, an omnipotent is an impossibility.  And if your lady isn’t shouting, “Oh god!” in bed, whether she believes in an omnipotent or not is not the important point…

Red Harvest–Scientific managements of human capabilities, a pure higher electro consciousness…

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